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NavyDads Book Nook

A Quiet Corner to Share Your Navy Media Recommendations with other Navy Dads & Moms.

Website: http://www.navydads.ning.com/group/navydadsbooknook
Members: 36
Latest Activity: Oct 5

Welcome to the NavyDads Media Center !

Share your recommendations for books and other media that you think would be of interest to other NavyDads.  I have numerous books I've read, and recently listened to via audiobook download, that generally concentrate on WWII Navy history that tell the recent combat history of the Navy and show where many current Navy doctrines and traditions have evolved from.  I find the stories compelling and make me even more proud to have a daughter that is a Navy veteran and a son on active duty and part of this long tradition of service.  Won't you share your recommendations as well?

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Comment by Val on September 23, 2017 at 8:25am

Thank you. It was quite sudden, which makes it a bit harder.

Those all sound interesting; I think I read the Mahaffey book when it first came out. (I love to browse the new nonfiction section of our library.)

Comment by NavyDads Admin (Paul) on September 22, 2017 at 12:56pm

So very sorry for your loss Val.  Prayers out for strength during this difficult time. 

Currently listening to: The Vaccine Race: How Scientists Used Human Cells to Combat Killer Viruses by Meredith Wadman.

Part way thru Alan Turing: The Enigma by Andrew Hodges. That is tough going as Hodges is a British author and he's kinda hard to read.

Recently finished: 

Code Warriors: NSA's Codebreakers and the Secret Intelligence War Against the Soviet Union by Stephen Budiansky and Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima by James Mahaffey

 

Comment by Val on September 22, 2017 at 11:52am

Hi Paul,

What sort of tech/biomed/medical stuff? I have been off my reading, as I just lost my mother unexpectedly. I had been reading a young adult series I had never read, and some old sci-fi (Asimov).

Comment by NavyDads Admin (Paul) on September 22, 2017 at 10:35am

I've moved away from military stuff for awhile....kinda back to my roots so to speak and have been reading/listening to tech/biomed/medical stuff recently......how about everyone else?  What have you all been reading? 

Comment by NavyDads Admin (Paul) on August 3, 2017 at 9:51pm

there is a discussion in the book very close to that....talking about "Crazy Ivan's"---not exactly like the movie but pretty crazy! Just finishing the section about Tautaug: This is from Wiki- On 20 June 1970, Tautog was patrolling the North Pacific Ocean near the city of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, on the Soviet Union's Kamchatka Peninsula, which was a major base for missile-armed submarines of the Soviet Navy. Tautog was attempting to trail the K-108, a Soviet Navy Echo II-class guided missile submarine nicknamed "Black Lila". The Soviet submarine was "close aboard" with Tautog, unaware that Tautog was in the vicinity, and the two submarines were within feet of one another for a lengthy period. Unable to determine the depth of the K-108, as new depth-finding hydrophones had not yet been installed, the American submarine was at a disadvantage in such close quarters. At some points the hydrographic equipment aboard Tautog registered zero distance between the submarines. At another point "Tautog's" hydrophone operators assumed the K-108 had risen to near the surface, placing the Soviet submarine directly above Tautog. Then the operators determined the Soviet vessel was descending. The trace on the oscilloscope, that gave the American submariners at visual reference as to the distance of the K-108, disappeared. Just as the captain began to say the Soviet sub was coming close aboard again, K-108 slammed belly first into the top of the Tautog's sail, proof the Soviet vessel had been descending from directly above. The K-108's massive screws came into contact with the steel of the Tautog's sail and lost one screw. This was confirmed by hydrographic sound of a turbine running away aboard the Soviet sub, being no longer coupled to a propeller.[5]Tautog suffered damage to her sail. As Tautog proceeded away from the site of the accident, her crew heard what they believed was K-108 breaking up and sinking.[6] When Tautog arrived in Pearl Harbor, a large portion of one of K-108's screws was found embedded in her sail. Over thirty years later, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, it was revealed that K-108 had actually been able to return to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. The former captain of the K-108, Boris Bogdasaryan, was able to provide a concise narrative of the collision. The collision resulted in no casualties aboard either submarine.

Comment by NavyDads CoAdmin Jim Gramza on August 3, 2017 at 9:21pm

"You gotta know when to flinch."

Comment by NavyDads Admin (Paul) on August 3, 2017 at 7:06pm

and another thought....lives have been lost in that game....on both sides

Comment by NavyDads Admin (Paul) on August 3, 2017 at 7:05pm

Thought I knew a little about some of the cat-and-mouse games we used to play....nope!!!  Have a new level of respect for submariners !

Comment by NavyDads CoAdmin Jim Gramza on August 3, 2017 at 6:15pm

Oh wow. Blind Man's Bluff sounds like one of those books that would be hard to put down! My ride to work isn't that long. It would take me forever to do it on audio.

Comment by NavyDads Admin (Paul) on August 3, 2017 at 3:46pm

Very interesting book!

Review I found:

No espionage missions have been kept more secret than those involving American submarines. Now, Blind Man's Bluff shows for the first time how the Navy sent submarines wired with self-destruct charges into the heart of Soviet seas to tap crucial underwater telephone cables. It unveils how the Navy's own negligence might have been responsible for the loss of the USS Scorpion, a submarine that disappeared, all hands lost, thirty years ago. It tells the complete story of the audacious attempt to steal a Soviet submarine with the help of eccentric billionaire Howard Hughes, and how it was doomed from the start. And it reveals how the Navy used the comforting notion of deep sea rescue vehicles to hide operations that were more James Bond than Jacques Cousteau.

Blind Man's Bluff contains an unforgettable array of characters, including the cowboy sub commander who brazenly outraced torpedoes and couldn't resist sneaking up to within feet of unaware enemy subs. It takes us inside clandestine Washington meetings where top submarine captains briefed presidents and where the espionage war was planned one sub and one dangerous encounter at a time. Stretching from the years immediately after World War II to the present-day operations of the Clinton Administration, it is an epic story of daring and deception. A magnificent achievement in investigative reporting, it feels like a spy thriller, but with one important difference'everything in it is true.

 

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