Navy Dads

Navy Terms and Definitions

Information

Navy Terms and Definitions

What does all this Navy talk mean? Your sailor will say things that make no sense, ask and we will explain.

Members: 37
Latest Activity: Jun 29

Discussion Forum

This group does not have any discussions yet.

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Navy Terms and Definitions to add comments!

Comment by David Wells on August 16, 2014 at 3:16pm

TOE THE LINE
When called to line up at attention, the ship's crew would form up with their toes touching a seam in the deck planking.

Comment by David Wells on August 16, 2014 at 3:16pm

UNDER THE WEATHER
If a crewman is standing watch on the weather side of the bow, he will be subject to the constant beating of the ocean spray. He will be "under the weather."

Comment by David Wells on August 16, 2014 at 3:15pm

CUT AND RUN
If a captain of a smaller ship encountered a large enemy vessel, he might decide that discretion was the better part of valor. He would order the crew to cut the lashings on all the sails and run away before the wind. This term also meant to cut the anchor cable and sail off in a hurry.

Comment by David Wells on August 16, 2014 at 3:15pm

AS THE CROW FLIES
When lost or unsure of their position in coastal waters, ships would release a caged crow. The crow would fly straight toward the nearest land, thus giving the vessel some sort of navigational fix. The tallest lookout platform on a ship came to be known as the "crow's nest."

Comment by David Wells on August 16, 2014 at 3:14pm

GROGGY
In 1740 British Admiral Vernon (whose nickname was "Old Grogram" for the cloak of grogram which he wore) ordered that the sailors' daily ration of rum be diluted with water. The men called the mixture "grog." A sailor who drank too much grog was "groggy."

Comment by David Wells on August 16, 2014 at 3:14pm

FOOTLOOSE
The bottom portion of a sail is called the foot. If it is not secured, it is "footloose" and dances randomly in the wind.

Comment by David Wells on August 16, 2014 at 3:13pm

DRESSING DOWN
Thin and worn sails were often treated with oil or wax to renew their effectiveness. This was called "dressing down." An officer or sailor who was reprimanded received a "dressing down."

Comment by David Wells on August 16, 2014 at 3:13pm

TO KNOW THE ROPES
There were miles of cordage in the rigging of a square rigged ship. The only way to keep track of and to know the function of all of these lines was to know where they were located. It took an experienced seaman to know the ropes.

Comment by David Wells on August 16, 2014 at 3:13pm

OVER THE BARREL
The most common method of punishment aboard ship was flogging. The unfortunate sailor was tied to a grating, a mast, or over the barrel of a deck cannon.

Comment by NavyDads Admin (Paul) on November 19, 2011 at 7:36pm

HooYah...

 

Members (37)

 
 
 

Welcome To Navy Dads

NavyDads Mission is to Provide Support, Encouragement, and Knowledge to Sailors and their Families throughout their Journey together in the United States Navy.

SUPPORTERS & FRIENDS

Military

Navy Midshipmen gear at Fanatics.com

Train with true warriors - Former Navy Seals challenge your physical capabilities

We offer american made flag display cases, Flag frames, and military gifts, visit us for great qulaty and fast service. Get your Shadowbox from USAMM

Google-Based NavyDads Search


  only search NavyDads

Blog Posts

Navy Submarine Flag

Posted by Wesley Brent Wertz on July 16, 2017 at 8:53am 2 Comments

P-Hold question

Posted by Dan Engle on June 30, 2017 at 7:07pm 3 Comments

? My son called and he failed

Posted by Brian on June 6, 2017 at 5:12pm 4 Comments

SHIPPING PACKAGES

Posted by L. Paul Saltzman on June 1, 2017 at 9:47am 0 Comments

Post Graduation Liberty

Posted by Joe Mooney on May 31, 2017 at 1:44pm 2 Comments

© 2017   Created by E.G. - ND's Creator/Admin.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service